Archivi categoria: ESTOTE PARATI

inizio ottobre: nuovo esercizio sulla coniugazione e il lessico dei verbi latini

Ciao a tutti,

un altro po’ di materiale per il ripasso sistematico sui verbi latini.

Come funziona? Si stampa il pdf degli esercizi a due pagine per foglio e in fronte e retro. Così su un solo foglio di carta ci stanno quattro pagine di domande. Un foglio al giorno, dieci-quindici minuti per compilare e riguardare. Ci sono le quattro coniugazioni, i principali verbi irregolari e i paradigmi dei verbi più comuni).

Con la puntualità di un volantino dell’Esselunga… ecco a voi:

 

Trovato un errore (ci scommetto)? Se avete tempo e voglia segnalatelo a gp DOT ciceri AT gmail DOT com (DOT diventa “.” e AT diventa “@”) con il numero del quiz e il nome del file pdf dove l’avete scoperto. Grazie sin d’ora.

 

Buona giornata


verbi latini: secondo esercizio sprint sul coniugazioni e lessico

Ciao a tutti,

dai verbi del repertorio di un corso memrise per il lessico latino di base (cliccate qui per i dettagli senza paura, è tutto gratis) e da altri verbi notevoli abbiamo tratto materiale per un esercizio/test tradizionale di ripasso sistematico.

Come funziona? Si stampa il pdf a due pagine per foglio e in fronte e retro: così su un solo foglio di carta ci stanno quattro pagine di domande (48 quesiti).

Posologia: un foglio al giorno, dieci-quindici minuti di tempo per compilare e riguardare. Ci sono le quattro coniugazioni, i principali verbi irregolari e i paradigmi dei verbi più comuni).

Ecco le dosi per questa settimana:

i quiz: svl01-201609_20160924-0900_sprintverbilatini

le soluzioni: svl01-201609_20160924-0900_sprintverbilatini-soluzioni

 

Trovato un errore (ce ne sono, ci scommetto)? Se avete tempo e voglia segnalatelo a gp DOT ciceri AT gmail DOT com (DOT diventa “.” e AT diventa “@”) con il numero del quiz e il nome del file pdf dove l’avete scoperto. Grazie sin d’ora.

 

Buona giornata


esercizio sprint sulla coniugazione e il lessico dei verbi latini

Ciao a tutti,

l’anno scorso avevamo messo su, un po’ alla svelta, un corso memrise per il lessico latino di base (cliccate qui per i dettagli senza paura, è tutto gratis). Dai verbi del repertorio di questo corso (e da altri verbi notevoli) abbiamo poi tratto materiale per un esercizio di ripasso sistematico.

Come funziona? Si stampa il pdf degli esercizi a due pagine per foglio e in fronte e retro. Così su un solo foglio di carta ci stanno quattro pagine di domande. Un foglio al giorno, dieci-quindici minuti per compilare e riguardare. Ci sono le quattro coniugazioni, i principali verbi irregolari e i paradigmi dei verbi più comuni).

Ecco gli esercizi per questa settimana: svl01-201609_20160914_sprintverbilatini (se proprio dovete, qui qualche soluzione: svl01-201609_20160914_sprintverbilatini-soluzioni)

Trovato un errore (ci scommetto)? Se avete tempo e voglia segnalatelo a gp DOT ciceri AT gmail DOT com (DOT diventa “.” e AT diventa “@”) con il numero del quiz e il nome del file pdf dove l’avete scoperto. Grazie sin d’ora.

 

Buona giornata


impara ad imparare: regole per studiare meglio (e per non fare finta di studiare)

Ciao a tutti,

una nuova sessione del corso Learning how to learn è iniziata lo scorso 5 Settembre, e lo si può seguire anche gratis. Quei geniali dell’Università della California a San Diego hanno idee piuttosto precise su come si faccia a imparare qualcosa, e nella loro benevolenza lo riassumono in due decaloghi – nessun vitello (né d’oro né dai piedi di balsa) è però stato prima messo a punto e distrutto poi nel corso della loro stesura: almeno a nostra migliore conoscenza.

Visto l’inizio dell’anno scolastico, sembra opportuno riproporre il tutto alla pubblica attenzione, consci del fatto che nel rappresentare l’autentica ricetta del risotto alla milanese a venti aspiranti cuochi solo un pajo la sapranno interpretare meravigliosamente sin da subito, mentre ad altri 16 servirà qualche periodo di apprendistato, più o meno lungo.

<citation>

These rules form a synthesis of some of the main ideas of the course–they are excerpted from the book A Mind for Numbers: How to Excel in Math and Science (Even if You Flunked Algebra), by Barbara Oakley, Penguin, July, 2014. Feel free to copy these rules and redistribute them, as long as you keep the original wording and this citation.

<citation/>

<original wording>

10 Rules of Good Studying

  1. Use recall. After you read a page, look away and recall the main ideas. Highlight very little, and never highlight anything you haven’t put in your mind first by recalling. Try recalling main ideas when you are walking to class or in a different room from where you originally learned it. An ability to recall—to generate the ideas from inside yourself—is one of the key indicators of good learning.
  2. Test yourself. On everything. All the time. Flash cards are your friend.
  3. Chunk your problems. Chunking is understanding and practicing with a problem solution so that it can all come to mind in a flash. After you solve a problem, rehearse it. Make sure you can solve it cold—every step. Pretend it’s a song and learn to play it over and over again in your mind, so the information combines into one smooth chunk you can pull up whenever you want.
  4. Space your repetition. Spread out your learning in any subject a little every day, just like an athlete. Your brain is like a muscle—it can handle only a limited amount of exercise on one subject at a time.
  5. Alternate different problem-solving techniques during your practice. Never practice too long at any one session using only one problem-solving technique—after a while, you are just mimicking what you did on the previous problem. Mix it up and work on different types of problems. This teaches you both how and when to use a technique. (Books generally are not set up this way, so you’ll need to do this on your own.) After every assignment and test, go over your errors, make sure you understand why you made them, and then rework your solutions. To study most effectively, handwrite (don’t type) a problem on one side of a flash card and the solution on the other. (Handwriting builds stronger neural structures in memory than typing.) You might also photograph the card if you want to load it into a study app on your smartphone. Quiz yourself randomly on different types of problems. Another way to do this is to randomly flip through your book, pick out a problem, and see whether you can solve it cold.
  6. Take breaks. It is common to be unable to solve problems or figure out concepts in math or science the first time you encounter them. This is why a little study every day is much better than a lot of studying all at once. When you get frustrated with a math or science problem, take a break so that another part of your mind can take over and work in the background.
  7. Use explanatory questioning and simple analogies. Whenever you are struggling with a concept, think to yourself, How can I explain this so that a ten-year-old could understand it? Using an analogy really helps, like saying that the flow of electricity is like the flow of water. Don’t just think your explanation—say it out loud or put it in writing. The additional effort of speaking and writing allows you to more deeply encode (that is, convert into neural memory structures) what you are learning.
  8. Focus. Turn off all interrupting beeps and alarms on your phone and computer, and then turn on a timer for twenty-five minutes. Focus intently for those twenty-five minutes and try to work as diligently as you can. After the timer goes off, give yourself a small, fun reward. A few of these sessions in a day can really move your studies forward. Try to set up times and places where studying—not glancing at your computer or phone—is just something you naturally do.
  9. Eat your frogs first. Do the hardest thing earliest in the day, when you are fresh.
  10. Make a mental contrast. Imagine where you’ve come from and contrast that with the dream of where your studies will take you. Post a picture or words in your workspace to remind you of your dream. Look at that when you find your motivation lagging. This work will pay off both for you and those you love!

10 Rules of Bad Studying

Avoid these techniques—they can waste your time even while they fool you into thinking you’re learning!

  1. Passive rereading—sitting passively and running your eyes back over a page. Unless you can prove that the material is moving into your brain by recalling the main ideas without looking at the page, rereading is a waste of time.
  2. Letting highlights overwhelm you. Highlighting your text can fool your mind into thinking you are putting something in your brain, when all you’re really doing is moving your hand. A little highlighting here and there is okay—sometimes it can be helpful in flagging important points. But if you are using highlighting as a memory tool, make sure that what you mark is also going into your brain.
  3. Merely glancing at a problem’s solution and thinking you know how to do it. This is one of the worst errors students make while studying. You need to be able to solve a problem step-by-step, without looking at the solution.
  4. Waiting until the last minute to study. Would you cram at the last minute if you were practicing for a track meet? Your brain is like a muscle—it can handle only a limited amount of exercise on one subject at a time.
  5. Repeatedly solving problems of the same type that you already know how to solve. If you just sit around solving similar problems during your practice, you’re not actually preparing for a test—it’s like preparing for a big basketball game by just practicing your dribbling.
  6. Letting study sessions with friends turn into chat sessions. Checking your problem solving with friends, and quizzing one another on what you know, can make learning more enjoyable, expose flaws in your thinking, and deepen your learning. But if your joint study sessions turn to fun before the work is done, you’re wasting your time and should find another study group.
  7. Neglecting to read the textbook before you start working problems. Would you dive into a pool before you knew how to swim? The textbook is your swimming instructor—it guides you toward the answers. You will flounder and waste your time if you don’t bother to read it. Before you begin to read, however, take a quick glance over the chapter or section to get a sense of what it’s about.
  8. Not checking with your instructors or classmates to clear up points of confusion. Professors are used to lost students coming in for guidance—it’s our job to help you. The students we worry about are the ones who don’t come in. Don’t be one of those students.
  9. Thinking you can learn deeply when you are being constantly distracted. Every tiny pull toward an instant message or conversation means you have less brain power to devote to learning. Every tug of interrupted attention pulls out tiny neural roots before they can grow.
  10. Not getting enough sleep. Your brain pieces together problem-solving techniques when you sleep, and it also practices and repeats whatever you put in mind before you go to sleep. Prolonged fatigue allows toxins to build up in the brain that disrupt the neural connections you need to think quickly and well. If you don’t get a good sleep before a test, NOTHING ELSE YOU HAVE DONE WILL MATTER.

<original wording/>


estote parati: verbi greci, il perfetto attivo (tutti i tipi)

Ciao a tutti,

altri materiali in preparazione al ritorno a scuola, in questo caso test per i verbi greci, il perfetto attivo (tutti i tipi). Ci sono quiz su: voci da coniugazioni per il verbo-tipo, temi di da verbi lessico di base per il ginnasio (dal libro di testo Hellenisti) e sintagmi verbali, dallo stesso lessico. Bisogna classificare e tradurre la voce verbale, specificando il corrispondente tema del presente.

In questo pdf ci sono i quesiti: tpe-201609a_20160906-2300_triathlon

C’è materiale per 6 giorni di lavoro, a quattro pagine al giorno.

 

Trovato un errore? Se avete tempo e voglia segnalatelo a gp DOT ciceri AT gmail DOT com (DOT diventa “.” e AT diventa “@”) con il numero del quiz e il nome del file pdf l’avete scoperto. Grazieeeeeee.


estote parati: coniugazione dei verbi latini (di tutti i tipi)

Ciao a tutti,

test-ripassone dei verbi latini. Sono 300 quiz: per il 30% circa voci da coniugazioni di verbi standard (le quattro coniugazioni, attivo e passivo, più i principali irregolari e difettivi), per un altro 30% circa sono voci di paradigma da lessico latino di base “le mille parole”; i restanti sono sintagmi verbali.

Come si compila? Si deve classificare (analisi grammaticale) il verbo, scriverne il paradigma e tradurre.

Qui ci sono i quesiti: TLATV03-201609A_20160905-0800_triathlon

C’è materiale per 6 giorni di lavoro, a quattro pagine al giorno.

Trovato un errore? Se avete tempo e voglia segnalatelo a gp DOT ciceri AT gmail DOT com (DOT diventa “.” e AT diventa “@”) con il numero del quiz e il nome del file pdf l’avete scoperto. Grazieeeeeee.


estote parati: verbi greci, aoristo e futuro (attivo, medio e passivo)

Ciao a tutti,

primi materiali in preparazione al ritorno a scuola (per il dopo ginnasio): aoristo e futuro di tutti i tipi. Sono quiz su: voci da coniugazioni per il verbo-tipo, temi da verbi lessico di base per il ginnasio (dal libro di testo Hellenisti) e sintagmi verbali, sempre dallo stesso lessico. Bisogna classificare e tradurre la voce verbale, specificando il corrispondente tema del presente.

C’è materiale per 6+6 giorni di lavoro, a quattro pagine al giorno.

Buon inizio settimana, buon lavoro.

 

Trovato un errore? Se avete tempo e voglia segnalatelo a gp DOT ciceri AT gmail DOT com (DOT diventa “.” e AT diventa “@”) con il numero del quiz e il nome del file pdf l’avete scoperto. Grazieeeeeee.


leggere Latino: ambizione oltre misura

Leggere testi latini a prima vista: è la volta di un classico – la rana che si gonfia.

In prato quondam rana conspexit bovem, et tacta invidia tantae magnitudinis rugosam inflavit pellem : tum natos suos interrogavit, an bove esset latior. Illi negarunt. Rursus intendit cutem maiore nisu et simili quaesivit modo, quis maior esset. Illi dixerunt bovem. Novissime indignata, dum vult validius inflare sese, rupto iacuit corpore.

Il testo non presenta difficoltà particolari. Qualche spunto:

  • tacta invidia. Quale costrutto è stato utilizzato? Come si traduce?
  • quis maior esset. Che preposizione è?
  • dum, tum, rursus. Vanno sapute.
  • novissime indignata. Quale costrutto è stato utilizzato? Come si traduce?

 

Anche questo esempio è tratto da Latin at sight: with an introduction, suggestions for sight-reading, and selections for practice. (E.Post, Ginn & Company, Boston, 1894)


estote parati: verbi greci, aoristo e futuro attivo e medio (tutti i tipi)

Ciao a tutti,

altri materiali in preparazione alla prossima verifica sui verbi, in questo caso aoristo e futuro attivo e medio (tutti i tipi di aoristo, tutti i tipi di futuro). Ci sono quiz su: voci da coniugazioni per il verbo-tipo, temi di da verbi lessico di base per il ginnasio (dal libro di testo Hellenisti) e sintagmi verbali, dallo stesso lessico. Bisogna classificare e tradurre la voce verbale, specificando il corrispondente tema del presente.

Nel pdf qui allegato ci sono i quesiti.

C’è materiale per 6 giorni di lavoro, a quattro pagine al giorno.


estote parati: verbi greci, perfetto attivo primo, secondo e terzo (debole, forte, fortissimo)

Ciao a tutti,

altri materiali in preparazione alla prossima verifica sui verbi, in questo caso il perfetto attivo debole, forte e fortissimo (primo, secondo e terzo). Ci sono quiz su: voci da coniugazioni per il verbo-tipo, temi di da verbi lessico di base per il ginnasio (dal libro di testo Hellenisti) e sintagmi verbali, dallo stesso lessico. Bisogna classificare e tradurre la voce verbale, specificando il corrispondente tema del presente.

Nel pdf qui allegato ci sono i quesiti.

 

C’è materiale per 6 giorni di lavoro, a quattro pagine al giorno.